DRIVERS LICENSE RESTORATION – DRUNK DRIVING

There are two parts to the process when applying to reinstate your Michigan Driving Privileges. The first process is the paperwork followed by a hearing that will either take place at a branch office in front of an attorney for the state or by videoconference at the branch office with a state attorney.

It is important to note that the entire process takes a minimum of 3 months or longer. Once the paperwork is completed and sent to the state in Lansing it takes minimum 8 weeks before your hearing date is scheduled.

STANDARDS for Issuance of a License

The Secretary of state has issued a detailed set of standards that must be met for a repeat Drunk Driver to receive a restricted license. This includes drivers with drug driving offenses or a combination of alcohol and drugs.

Rule 13(1)(a)-(b) states: The hearing officer shall not order that a license be issued unless you prove by clear and convincing evidence all of the following:

(1) That your alcohol or substance abuse problems, if any, are under control and likely to remain under control.

(2) That your risk of repeating past abusive behavior is a low or minimal risk.

(3) That the risk of you repeating the act of operating a motor vehicle while impaired by, or under the influence of alcohol or controlled substances or a combination of alcohol or controlled substance is a low or minimal risk.

(4) That you have the ability and motivation to drive safely and within the law.


(5) And other relevant issues contained in the rule and statue.

Its is imperative, if not essential to make sure that your hearing goes smoothly and is effective in obtaining your restricted license. Losing at a reinstatement hearing takes another year of you not having a license. Do the right thing and lawyer-up.

PLEASE DO NOT RELY upon any of the information contained in this article when trying to represent yourself. You should always consult with an attorney before relying upon any written advice, article, blog etc.

If you or someone you know needs to have their driving privilege’s reinstated than you need to contact Michigan Drivers Restoration Lawyer Josh Jones today for your free consultation—7-days a week by phone, text, email or instant message.

People v Hartwick & People v Tuttle – Defining The MMMA

At the end July 2015, the Michigan Supreme Court (MSC) issues a written opinion in two different cases, known as People v Hartwick and People v Tuttle. This opinion provides a specific and detail analysis of what is required by an individual wanting to present an Immunity defense, under § 4 of the MMMA, and an Affirmative defense, under § 8 of the MMMA.

Essentially, the Court in People v Hartwick answered multiple questions dealing with both defenses found under the MMMA. One primary issue that the court considered was what the burden of proof the defendant has when presenting a defense under § 4 or § 8. The MMMA was silent on the burden of proof required to substantiate either defense, and inevitably the Court determined that under both defense a preponderance of the evidence standard would be followed. In general terms, a preponderance of the evidence burden standard can be compared to a balancing of scales: if the defendant show by 51% that he has substantiated the elements under either defense he or she would have satisfied his or her burden for that particular defense.

Another interesting determination in People v Hartwick was in regards to § 4 and where the Court explained that a claim for immunity will not be considered a catch-all type of rule. What this means is that an individual who may have conduct that is illegal or outside the confines of § 4 will not be precluded from using the immunity defense on all conduct that is being alleged against him. Essentially, what this means is that a court must apply the immunity defense independently to each individual charge that a defendant faces. This is very unique for MMMA cases, but it is also complex.

The largest impact or defining moment within People v Hartwick is the holding the Court made on § 8. The Court explained that an individual who possesses a valid Michigan Medical Marihuana card does not automatically, or presumptively, meet the first element of a § 8 defense. This means that an individual defendant wanting to provide a defense under § 8 of the MMMA must provide specific evidence establishing by a preponderance of the evidence that “[a] physician has stated that, in the physician’s professional opinion, after having completed a full assessment of the patient’s medical history and current medical condition made in the course of a bona fide physician-patient relationship, the patient is likely to receive therapeutic or palliative benefit from the medical use of marihuana to treat or alleviate the patient’s serious or debilitating medical condition or symptoms of the patient’s serious or debilitating medical condition.” People v Hartwick.

The Court in People v Hartwick took this a step further and explained that an individual caregiver wanting to rely on a § 8 defense must substantiate certain and specific facts regarding the patient that he or she is assisting. Specifically, the caregiver would need to establish the same facts as a patient presenting the § 8 defense for him or herself. These facts would include but are not limited to the amount of marihuana needed or required to treat the patient’s medical condition or establishing that the patient has satisfied the bona-fide physician/patient relationship.

The MSC in People v Hartwick, at the end of the day, provided guidance on what is needed in order to establish the defense found within the MMMA; however, the evidentiary requirements under § 8 have been narrowed. This narrowing in the interpretation of the MMMA will require individuals looking to maintain a § 8 defense to maintain specific information and explanation in regards to his or her medical use of marihuana. This ideal applies to both caregivers and patients.

Contact your Michigan Marihuana Lawyer today, so you can continue to smoke carefree.

DO NOT RELY ON THESE LEGAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS WHEN REPRESENTING YOURSELF IN COURT. THESE ARTICLES ARE NOT MEANT TO COMPENSATE OR EFFECUATE LEGAL REPRESENTATION. YOU SHOULD AND MUST CONTACT AN ATTORNEY AND DISCUSS WITH HIM OR HER THE CONSEQUENCES OF ANY AND ALL IDEAS, STATEMENTS, OPINIONS, EXPRESSIONS OR OTHERWISE STATED ON THIS SITE. HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON.

Michigan Marihuana Caregiver Qualifications

Here in the State of Michigan there are certain requirements and criminal charges that can and will extend from specific violations of the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act (aka MMMA). Legislation found in the MMMA that became effective April 1, 2013 chances the landscape the individuals under the MMMA, specifically MMMA caregivers.

One of the biggest and having the most impact on the MMMA caregivers (and the MMMA community in general) has be the change in the definition of the term caregiver. In essence the change in the MMMA caregiver definition made those who currently have felony convictions on their records unable to obtain such a certification or license to be a caregiver. This means fewer individual will be unable to become MMMA caregivers.

This limit or restriction only applies to the past ten (10) years. However, the new definition does require an individual to remain free of felony drug convictions and assaultive convictions for their lifetime, or in other words the 10-year rule does not apply if an individual has been convicted of such a crime. Therefore, a MMMA caregiver must not only be 21 years or older but maintain a criminal record free of felonies within the last 10 years, unless it is a drug or assaultive conviction as designated by the MMMA.

This is important information for those individual who want to become MMMA caregivers. These and other new amendments can and will affect the medical marijuana community. Make sure you know what you can and cannot due with your certification to use marijuana. It could keep you out of jail and allowing you to continue to blow smoke. Josh Jones has your back 7-days a week and is your Michigan Marihuana Lawyer.

PLEASE DO NOT RELY ON THESE LEGAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS WHEN REPRESENTING YOURSELF IN COURT. THESE ARTICLES ARE NOT MEANT TO COMPENSATE OR EFFECUATE LEGAL REPRESENTATION. YOU SHOULD AND MUST CONTACT AN ATTORNEY AND DISCUSS WITH HIM OR HER THE CONSEQUENCES OF ANY AND ALL IDEAS, STATEMENTS, OPINIONS, EXPRESSIONS OR OTHERWISE STATED ON THIS SITE. WE HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON. 

Michigan Court of Appeals Expands 2nd Amendment in People v Yanna

In People v Yanna, the Michigan Court of Appeals expanded the Second Amendment to include the use of tasers and stun-guns by private individuals. See People v Yanna. This determination rendered MCL 750.224a unconstitutional, which prohibited the use or possession of such a weapon by private citizens.

The issue regarding the Second Amendment was raised in trial, by a motion to dismiss, explaining that individuals had a right to “bear” stun-guns because it would qualify under the term “arms.” The Court of Appeals explained that the Second Amendment encapsulates all versions of “arms,” including those not forged at the time of its enactment.

However, there are two exceptions to the general rule, which includes those weapons not typically possessed by “law-abiding citizens for lawful purposes” and a prohibition on carrying “dangerous and unusual weapons.”

In the end, the court determined that stun-guns do not fit within any of the Second Amendment exceptions and held that a complete ban on that specific weapon is unconstitutional. Further, the court explained that citizens had a right to openly carry the weapon here in the State of Michigan. This holding stemmed from multiple sources, including Dist. of Columbia v Heller, the Second Amendment (allowing the right to “carry” and “keep” arms), and the Michigan Constitution (allowing the right to “bear” arms for self-defense).

PLEASE DO NOT RELY upon any of the information contained in this article when trying to represent yourself. You should always consult with an attorney before relying upon any written advice, article, blog etc.

Traffic & Criminal Citations Come In Multiple Forms

Have you ever been charged with a criminal misdemeanor, yet not taken to jail or arrested, but rather issued a citation? A criminal citation is a ticket that police officers issue to individuals for certain low-level crimes. They can be in the form of a criminal misdemeanor or a civil (traffic) infraction.

Procedure

Civil Citations will generally notify the individual of the violation committed, and the date and time he or she must appear in court or direct the individual to contact the court personally within a specified amount of time in order to obtain a date to formally appear at the court. Criminal citations attach a more stringent process because the individual will be required to appear at court.

It is important to note that the time between the citation being issued and when you must appear in court can and may be a long time apart—the reason for this is that the police and prosecutor are waiting for lab reports or other evidence to be submitted. It is essential to stay in contact with the court or your attorney if you believe that you will be charged with a criminal misdemeanor (or felony) so that you do not receive an outstanding bench warrant.

For simple civil infractions, i.e. speeding or parking tickets, you will have one of two options. The first will be to simply pay the applicable fine for the particular infraction(s) committed. The second option will be to request one of two types of hearings (an informal or formal hearing). The formal hearing will be with the officer, and the informal will be with the prosecutor. If you choose to set the matter for a hearing you must do so within the specified number of days listed on the ticket or indicated by the court.

No matter the issue – Lawyer-Up

An attorney will be able to help you walk through this process with the little of ease because they are skilled and trained for performing such tasks. Why try to fight something alone when the individual you must fight against is a trained professional? Know the law, maintain your rights, and always lawyer-up with Josh Jones.

The State of Michigan has various alcohol related crimes involving various criminal acts, especially those involved with a motor vehicle. These charges and/or convictions include, but are not limited to, licensing sanction, jail time, fines, community service and/or counseling.

It is imperative to know what can and will happen to you if you choose to accept or plea guilty to or are convicted of the following:

ZERO TOLERANCE MCL 257.625(6) – individuals under 21 with a Blood Alcohol Content (aka BAC) and operating a motor vehicle are guilty of a criminal misdemeanor. No statutory jail is required, but the he or she shall be sentenced to pay a fine of not less than $200.00 or more than $1,000.00 with Licensing Sanctions as follows: 1st offense – 30 day suspension with restrictions after that time; 2nd offense within 7 years is a 90 day suspension.

Operating While Visibly Impaired (aka OWVI) MCL 257.625(3) – has a maximum jail time of 93 days with maximum fines of $300.00 and Licensing Sanctions as followed: 1st offense: 90 day suspension with restrictions; 2nd offense within 7 years or prior MCL 257.625 conviction then it is an indefinite revocation and eligible for restriction after 1 year; 3rd offense or 2 prior MCL 257.625 convictions then it’s a 1-5 year revocation.

Operating While Intoxicated of Controlled Substance is not an alcohol related crime; however, it still a drunk driving charge (known as OWIPD).

Operating While Intoxicated 2nd (aka OWI) has a jail term of 5 days to 1 year and a $200.00 to $1,000.00 fine. The license sanction is a 1-year revocation if prior MCL 257.625 conviction within 7 years. The vehicle may also be subject to immobilization pursuant to MCL 257.625.

Operating While Intoxicated 3rd (OWI 3rd) 30 days to 1 year in jail. The licensing sanction is a 1- to 5-year revocation.

Operating With High BAC – An OWI charge, which can be an alcohol related crime occurs whem the individual has a BAC of .17 or more. The maximum jail up to 180 days with a possible $200-$700 fine.

Moreover, an individual should note that the maximum possible licensing sanction that may be imposed would be based upon the master driving record maintained by the Secretary of State under MCL 257.204 [257.625b(4)]. Prior issues with the drivers’ license can impact the ability for an individual to obtain his or her license when facing any of the above-mentioned crimes.

ALL THE ABOVE MAY BE SUBJECT, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO, THE FOLLOWING:

  1. Secretary of State will or may suspend your driver’s license.
  2. The Court will suspend your driver’s license.
  3. Secretary of State will revoke or deny your driver’s license
  4. Screening and Assessment for substance abuse and rehabilitation may be part of any sentence order, all at the defendant’s expense. MCL 257.625b(5)
  5. Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (aka BAIRD) placed in defendant’s vehicle for a specified amount of time will be ordered at defendant’s expense.
  6. Community Service.
  7. In addition, defendant may be ordered to pay restitution, cost of prosecution, and reimburse the county for your jail stay and probation oversight fees.

Always consult an Attorney prior to moving forward in any criminal matter, especially one that is an alcohol related crime. Criminal charges, especially alcohol and drug related offenses, will and can impact an individual in multiple ways. Make sure that you have the right person in your corner. Josh Jones has your back 7-days a week. Contact him today!

DO NOT RELY ON THESE LEGAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS WHEN REPRESENTING YOURSELF IN COURT. THESE ARTICLES ARE NOT MEANT TO COMPENSATE OR EFFECUATE LEGAL REPRESENTATION. YOU SHOULD AND MUST CONTACT AN ATTORNEY AND DISCUSS WITH HIM OR HER THE CONSEQUENCES OF ANY AND ALL IDEAS, STATEMENTS, OPINIONS, EXPRESSIONS OR OTHERWISE STATED ON THIS SITE. HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON.

Open Intoxicants – Open Alcohol In A Motor Vehicle

What is open intoxicants? Did you know that if you are in a vehicle that is upon a highway or otherwise open to the general public or generally accessible to motor vehicles you are not allowed to have an open container of alcohol? This applies to individuals that are driving or simply a passenger found within the motor vehicle. See MCL § 257.624a. This is known as open intoxicants within a motor vehicle, and is considered a misdemeanor here in the State of Michigan.

The rule states as follows that individuals are “not allowed to not transport or possess alcoholic liquor in a container that is open or uncapped or upon which the seal is broken within the passenger area of a vehicle,” i.e.e not possess open intoxicants within a motor vehicle. MCL § 257.624a(1). A passenger area of a vehicle has been defined as: “means the area designed to seat the operator and passengers of a motor vehicle while it is in operation and any area that is readily accessible to the operator or a passenger while in his or her seating position, including the glove compartment.” MCL § 257.624a(5)(d). As you can see both the driver and the passenger can be guilty of open intoxicants here in Michigan.

If an individual is convicted of open intoxicants for the first time he or she will receive two (2) points on his or her drivers license. Also, a misdemeanor will be placed on the individual’s record. Moreover, if an individual is convicted of open intoxicants two (2) times within 7-years then he or she will receive a 30-day suspension followed by 60-days of having a restricted license. An individual convicted of open intoxicants three (3) times will receive a 60-day suspension with a 305-day restricted.

It is imperative to know what happens to your license when you plead to or are convicted of an alcohol or drug crime, such as open intoxicants here in Michigan. An individual may also have to perform community service and undergo substance abuse counseling at the direction of the court if they plead guilty to or are convicted of open intoxicants. It is logical to see that subsequent convictions of open intoxicants will only increase your risk of a more severe punishments during the sentencing stage of the criminal process.

What’s more important is knowing that your past criminal history, if involving alcohol or drugs, will only bring about more licensing issues and stiffer requirements while on probation, which is the reason it is a logical thought and comment. Other crimes can too have an impact on when you can drive again, even when the prior conviction is not a open intoxicant charge.

Contact a criminal defense attorney immediately if you are involved in any kind of criminal action, whether it is a misdemeanor or a felony. Josh Jones is your Michigan Criminal Lawyer and is here for your 7-days a week. 734-355-0424 or 810-691-7308 today!

DO NOT RELY ON THESE LEGAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS WHEN REPRESENTING YOURSELF IN COURT. THESE ARTICLES ARE NOT MEANT TO COMPENSATE OR EFFECUATE LEGAL REPRESENTATION. YOU SHOULD AND MUST CONTACT AN ATTORNEY AND DISCUSS WITH HIM OR HER THE CONSEQUENCES OF ANY AND ALL IDEAS, STATEMENTS, OPINIONS, EXPRESSIONS OR OTHERWISE STATED ON THIS SITE. HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON.

Michigan Common Criminal Law Questions

The following Common Criminal law QUESTIONS and ANSWERS will provide you with an insight into some of the most common criminal terms and procedures used within the Michigan Criminal Justice System. Knowing the law and the answers to these common criminal law questions can and will help protect your rights when or if you are criminally charged or involved with law enforcement.

Q: What is a criminal felony?

A: Felonies are crimes that have a punishment consisting of imprisonment for more than one year while also attaching fines and court costs with a variety of other terms if placed on probation or parole. The punishments for these crimes are controlled by Statute. Examples of such crimes include, but are not limited too: Felonious Assault, Murder, Criminal Sexual Conduct, Home Invasion, Delivery or Manufacturing a Controlled Substance or Marihuana.

Q: What is a criminal misdemeanor?

A: Misdemeanors are crimes that have been categorized as less serious offenses as compared to felonies. Most misdemeanors range in punishment from by ninety days to one-year imprisonment plus any fines and costs ordered. Some Misdemeanors (known as High-Court Misdemeanors) can have punishment that exceeds a one-year maximum jail term. These crimes are also controlled by Statute or they will be controlled and prosecuted at the local level through Municipal Ordinances. Examples of these crimes are: Use of Marihuana, Possession of Marihuana, Disorderly Persons, Minor in Possession (aka MIP), Drunk Driving.

Q: What are Miranda Rights?

A: Miranda rights originated in United States Supreme Court case of Miranda v Arizona, 384 US 436 (1966). The Miranda Rights is a warning of stated rights by law enforcement, which must provide to the accused (or questioned) prior to a custodial interrogation taking place. The right outlines that he or she does not have to speak to the police, that he or she has the right to remain silent (which must be explicitly responded to), and that he or she has the right to the assistance of counsel.

Q: What will happen if the police do not give or read me my Miranda Rights?

A: If police take any statement from the accused without informing the individual of his or her Miranda Rights then the statement(s) made to the officers may be “suppressed.” This means the prosecutor may be barred from using the statement against the individual. However, this area of the law is very complex (and factually driven) and should always be handled by and discussed with an Attorney.

Q: What is a Michigan District Court?

A: The District Court is the court that oversees and handled all criminal misdemeanors. All adult criminal cases will begin in the district court, and when the matters involved only misdemeanors the District Court will dispose of those matters as well. In felony cases, the District Courts handle the initial arraignments, setting bond, and will conduct felony preliminary examinations.

Q: What is Michigan Circuit Court?

A: A Circuit Court handles all felony charges and any misdemeanors attached or charged along with the felonies. A felony charge (or case) will only make it to Circuit Court if the District Court has found probable cause that a felony was committed and that the individual charged committed that crime. This process is called “bind-over” and is determined at the preliminary hearing held in the District Court.

Q: What is a bench warrant?

A: A court order requiring the arrest of a defendant. Generally, these are issued when a defendant has failed to appear at court when directed or has violated a court order, term of probation or a condition of bond.

Q: What is criminal arraignment?

A: The initial court appearance by the defendant after being charged with a crime. This hearing is generally limited to identifying the defendant as the defendant, making sure the defendant understands the charges pending against him or her, and setting bond.

Q: What is a preliminary examination hearing?

A: This is the probable cause hearing (as mentioned above), which will usually occur within 14-days of the arraignment date. This type of hearing only occurs in felony matters. The purpose of the hearing is for the prosecutor to establish, by probable cause, that a crime was committed and the defendant committed the crime.

Q: What is pretrial conference?

A: This is a court-scheduled meeting between the defendant (or his or her attorney) and the prosecutor—these may be called scheduling conferences. Generally, potential plea bargains, the scheduling of motions, and/or choosing a date for trial will be performed.

Q: How is sentencing in Michigan performed?

A: The Sentencing will occur after a defendant has been found guilty or pleads guilty to a crime. This is where the judge will impose his or her punishment onto the defendant pursuant to statute and some discretion. Generally, for felonies and some misdemeanors, prior to sentencing a Pre-Sentence Investigation Report (aka PSI) will be scribed, which is performed by the Court’s Probation Department. The PSI will contain information regarding the defendant’s background, the offense committed, other relevant information, and a sentencing recommendation written by the Probation Department. The judge when determining the appropriate sentence for the individual defendant uses the PSI.

Josh Jones, Michigan Criminal & Marijuana Lawyer, can provide you with your answers to even more common criminal law questions. Contact him 7-days a week at 810-691-7308 or 734-355-0424.

Michigan Disturbing The Peace MCL 750.170

Disturbing the Peace MCL 750.170 is an actual crime here in the State of Michigan, which covers a large array of acts that could potentially land someone with a criminal misdemeanor on his or her record. Generally, Disturbing the Peace MCL 750.170 falls under local ordinances rather than under the state law. Therefore, the possible punishments and fines can and could vary depending on the arresting agency.

However, the State of Michigan Statute and under State law, Disturbing the Peace MCL 750.170, states

“Any person who shall make or excite any disturbance or contention in any tavern, store or grocery, manufacturing establishment or any other business place or in any street, lane, alley, highway, public building, grounds or park, or at any election or other public meeting where citizens are peaceably and lawfully assembled, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.”

It is important to note that Disturbing the Peace MCL 750.150 whether charged under State law or local ordinance, revolves around the idea of maintaining respect between you and your neighbors (or others in society). Therefore, the goal of Disturbing the Peace MCL 750.150 is to prevent disruption to those around us and to always think before you act. Is you radio too loud, are you screaming, do you have a dog, is there an odor coming from your home, or something else that is causing a disruption to the public.

Josh Jones is here for you no matter what the problem may be, whether it involves criminal misdemeanors or felonies. He has you back. Josh Jones understands that situations can be troublesome and confusing, but that does not mean they have to take over your life. He is here to fight for you, not matter the case or the facts. Always lawyer-up. No criminal issue is to small to deal with on your own.

PLEASE DO NOT RELY ON THESE LEGAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS WHEN REPRESENTING YOURSELF IN COURT. THESE ARTICLES ARE NOT MEANT TO COMPENSATE OR EFFECUATE LEGAL REPRESENTATION. YOU SHOULD AND MUST ALWAYS CONTACT AN ATTORNEY AND DISCUSS WITH HIM OR HER THE CONSEQUENCES OF ANY AND ALL IDEAS, STATEMENTS, OPINIONS, EXPRESSIONS OR OTHERWISE STATED ON THIS SITE. HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON. 

What is a Michigan Retail Fraud charge?

The State of Michigan statutorily divides up it theft crimes into multiple categories, which includes Michigan retail fraud. The statutes go even further and divide Michigan retail fraud into separate classes or degrees that vary depending upon the act and amount of merchandise involved in the alleged Michigan retail fraud charge. Each degree maintains and has corresponding degrees of punishments for each separate crime, and thus it becomes essential to know the exact criminal charge pending when involved with a Michigan retail fraud matter.

Michigan Retail Fraud in the first degree is limited to instances where the value of the property exceeds $1,000.00 and is punishable as a felony. An individual can face up to 5-years in jail and/or a fine of $10,000.00 or 3 times the amount of the value of the property taken, whichever is greater. Moreover, the prosecutor is allowed to use and aggregate multiple incidents, of retail fraud, over a 12-month period to determine the property value amount under this statute.

The other two degrees of Michigan Retail Fraud are both misdemeanors, and thus the maximum punishment is 1-year (if convicted for second degree retail fraud) and 93-days for an individual convicted of retail fraud in the third degree. Moreover, the value of property cannot exceed $1,000.00 for a second degree charge and property less than $200.00 will attach a third degree charge.

To note, the statute does allow for statutory increases in punishment for those individuals who have been convicted of the crime on a prior conviction. This applies to all degrees of retail fraud and is enumerated by statute. Furthermore, Michigan Retail Fraud law also now allows for a more severe crime of Organized Michigan Retail Crime Act when the individual is alleged to have committed the theft with the intent to resell, distribute or return the items for gain.

PLEASE DO NOT RELY ON THESE LEGAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS WHEN REPRESENTING YOURSELF IN COURT. THESE ARTICLES ARE NOT MEANT TO COMPENSATE OR EFFECUATE LEGAL REPRESENTATION. YOU SHOULD AND MUST CONTACT AN ATTORNEY AND DISCUSS WITH HIM OR HER THE CONSEQUENCES OF ANY AND ALL IDEAS, STATEMENTS, OPINIONS, EXPRESSIONS OR OTHERWISE STATED ON THIS SITE. HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON.