What is Michigan Larceny?

Michigan larceny can loosely be defined as the taking of something (property) from another. The State of Michigan makes this particular area of law somewhat complex because of the various acts and property that can be involved in a Michigan larceny. Furthermore, there are numerous variations of punishment based upon the circumstances of an individual’s case and the property involved.

First and foremost, “[a] person who commits [Michigan] larceny by stealing any of the following [pieces of] property of another person is guilty of a crime,” see MCL 750.356, which includes:

(a) Money, goods, or chattels.

(b) A bank note, bank bill, bond, promissory note, due bill, bill of exchange or other bill, draft, order, or certificate.

(c) A book of accounts for or concerning money or goods due, to become due, or to be delivered.

(d) A deed or writing containing a conveyance of land or other valuable contract in force.

(e) A receipt, release, or defeasance.

(f) A writ, process, or public record.

(g) Nonferrous metal.

Once the property falls within one of the above categories, an individual charged with Michigan larceny can face, if convicted, one of the following punishments, see MCL 750.356:

  1. [A] person is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 10 years or a fine of not more than $15,000.00 or 3 times the value of the property stolen, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine . . . [if t]he property stolen has a value of $20,000.00 or more.
  2. [A] person is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00 or 3 times the value of the property stolen, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine . . . [if t]he property stolen has a value of $1,000.00 or more but less than $20,000.00.
  3. [A] person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 1 year or a fine of not more than $2,000.00 or 3 times the value of the property stolen, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine . . . [if t]he property stolen has a value of $200.00 or more but less than $1,000.00.
  4. If the property stolen has a value of less than $200.00, the person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00 or 3 times the value of the property stolen, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine.

Moreover, if an individual is convicted of a second or subsequent Michigan larceny charge than he or she will face an even hasher punishment than noted above. This enhancement in jail and fines is common in Michigan, and does not include the crime of Michigan larceny. The more crimes you commit the higher the jail exposure. Whenever you are faced with a Michigan larceny charge or other criminal charge contact Josh Jones today. He maintains a full-service criminal defense firm for you, and he always has your back.

PLEASE DO NOT RELY ON THESE LEGAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS WHEN REPRESENTING YOURSELF IN COURT. THESE ARTICLES ARE NOT MEANT TO COMPENSATE OR EFFECUATE LEGAL REPRESENTATION. YOU SHOULD AND MUST CONTACT AN ATTORNEY AND DISCUSS WITH HIM OR HER THE CONSEQUENCES OF ANY AND ALL IDEAS, STATEMENTS, OPINIONS, EXPRESSIONS OR OTHERWISE STATED ON THIS SITE. HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON.

About Josh Jones

Josh Jones is an experienced and professional Michigan Criminal Defense attorney presenting Metro Detroit, Genesee County, Livingston County, Lapeer County, and others throughout the State of Michigan. He is available 7-days a week and handles all felonies, misdemeanors, probation violations, traffic tickets, and drivers license restoration. Josh is only a phone call away and is here to help when you are involved with the criminal justice system.